Post-election Conversations

From The Office of Religious Life, Division of Student Affairs, Diversity Steering Committee and The Office of the Provost

Important Information and Resources for the USC Community

Upcoming Campus Events

Past Events

Wednesday, November 9:

  • From 1 p.m.-6 p.m. Room 302 RTCC will be available for open discussions. Counselors, Student Affairs staff, and Residential Faculty will be in attendance to facilitate conversations. We invite faculty to listen and share with students who stop by.
  • The United University Church and USC Hillel will both be open all day for students and will have opportunities for reflection, prayer, and community, as well as plenty of food for students.
  • The Graduate Policy Administration Community invites all to their monthly mixer at The Lab from 4:30 – 6:30 (From the GPAC Board: “1. Hug me today, and 2. Organize tomorrow. Let’s do that. We must respect and support each other. We must be our own coalition.”)

Thursday, November 10:

The US-MEX Network is hosting Univision News Anchor, Leon Krauze, for a discussion about the implications of the election for Latinos, Mexico and US-Mexico relations in TCC 350 12:00 noon to 1:00 p.m.

USC Price School of Public Policy hosts a “Black Lives Matter” panel discussion in RGL 101 (Lewis Hall) at 6:00 p.m.

A student-organized peaceful gathering will come together on Trousdale at 6:00 p.m.

Friday, November 11:

At 1:00 p.m., the Eileen Norris Theatre Complex in the Cinematic Arts Building will be offered as a gathering space for people of all political parties and preferences to come together and express their thoughts and feelings as we reflect on this past election and the road ahead. No need to RSVP. Everyone is welcome!

Tuesday, November 15:

An Open Forum will be held 12:00 noon to 1:00 p.m. for all members of the Trojan Family to discuss the post-election climate and where we go from here in Wallis Annenberg Hall (ANN), Forum/ Lobby.

Wednesday, November 16:

Media and public event: USC experts in social media, psychology, political science, policy, law and journalism on Wednesday will discuss the election’s impact on several issues – from concerns about human rights to our relationships on social media. Panelists will also discuss the USC Dornsife/LA Times Presidential Election Daybreak poll. View details on the media advisory. Verna and Peter Dauterive Hall, 645 Exposition Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90089; Room LL101

USC Price School community event: USC Price Dean Jack H. Knott will hold an Open Conversation on the implications of the election from 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm in RGL 209. There will be food and drink, and a space for any who wish to share concerns, fears or ideas about ways to move forward. Due to space considerations, this event is open only to USC Price School students.

Thursday, November 17:

What does the 2016 election mean for immigrants and comprehensive immigration reform, and what progress can be made on the state and local levels? Join USC Dornsife Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration from 12:30 p.m. to 1:50 p.m. for “Now What? Immigrant Integration After the 2016 Presidential Election” in USC Caruso Catholic Center Newman Hall.

USC Price Latino Association invites all students to share thoughts, hopes, and fears surrounding the changing political landscape following the 2016 election in “What Just Happened?” from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. in RGL 101.

Monday, November 21:

Keck School of Medicine of USC’s Department of Preventive Medicine is sponsoring a panel discussion titled “Elections and Public Health,” from 5:15 in Soto Building 1, Room 115/116.

Tuesday, November 29:

The USC Rossier Student Organization is collaborating with the Student Community of Ph.D.’s in Education (SCOPE) to create an open and safe space for students to discuss the results of the election, as well as how it affects our role as leaders, educators, and clinicians in the field. Join Master’s and Doctoral students at 6:30pm in Verna & Peter Dauterive Hall (VPD) 116 to voice questions, concerns, and stories during our Post Election Discussion.

The 2016 Presidential Election Conference brings together a wide range of veteran political strategists, award-winning journalists, and top academic researchers in panel discussions to explore many facets of presidential election politics – from media coverage, to voter mobilization, to the future direction of our country’s politics under the newly-elected administration. The full-day Town & Gown event is free but space is limited.

Wednesday, November 30:

USC Gould School of Law will hold an information session for DACA, undocumented and immigrant students and allies, titled “What to Expect from the New Presidency.” Professor Niels Frenzen and Professor Jean Reisz of the USC Immigration Clinic will discuss the impact of the Trump Presidency 6-7:30 p.m. in Room 7 Musick Law Bldg (LAW).

Monday, December 5:

USC Gould School of Law will hold an information session for DACA, undocumented and immigrant students and allies, titled “What to Expect from the New Presidency.” Professor Niels Frenzen and Professor Jean Reisz of the USC Immigration Clinic will discuss the impact of the Trump Presidency 6-7:30 p.m. in El Centro Chicano (STU 402).

January 20, 2017 (Inauguration Day)

  • 8:00-10:30 A.M.: Presidential Inauguration Viewing: USC Annenberg Center and Unruh Institute of Politics (Wallis Annenberg Hall) will hold an informal viewing event. It will include an open conversation with students, faculty and staff before and after the ceremony with special guest Justin Wallin, Probolsky Research COO/CMO. Coffee and pastries will be provided.
  • 8:30-11:00 A.M.: Alternative Inauguration Programming: CBCSA (STU 415), APASS (STU 410), and LGBT RC (STU 202B) will have informal open space for conversations. USC Cultural Centers & #TogetherUSC will be hosting a series of programs and conversation space for all students to join. Staff will be on hand to support students, assist with critical conversations, and discuss inclusivity and the Trojan Family.
  • 9:00 A.M.-4:00 P.M.: El Centro (STU 402) will show various alternative inauguration films and shows.
  • 11:00 A.M.: Student Demonstration at Tommy Trojan.
  • 12:45 P.M. Office of Religious Life (URC 106) will be walking to mosque Masjid Umar Ibn Al-Khattab, showing solidarity and support for Muslims. The prayer session is open to all community members and will be done in partnership with progressive Christian student groups and the LGBT Resource Center.
  • 1:30–5:00 P.M.: Free Expression Space: Cultural Center Staff and Counseling Center Staff (TCC 302) will provide a guided expressive space, through various art mediums.

Tuesday, January 31:

The USC Unruh Institute of Politics presents “Trump’s Plan to Save Middle America,” a discussion about Trump’s economic plan and how it will impact the U.S. economy at 6 p.m. at Ground Zero Performance Cafe. Special guests include Brian Calle, Opinion Editor for the Orange County Register, and Matt Klink, President and Owner of Klink Campaigns. Free food will be provided and starts at 5:30 p.m.

Wednesday, February 1:

The whole USC community is invited to a “Teach-In at 5 p.m. at United University Church (UUC). Professors, students and policy experts will be discussing the new administration’s travel restrictions, followed by a Q&A. Sponsored by the Office of Religious Life and the United University Church.

Thursday, February 2:

USC Dornsife is holding an “Open Forum on Executive Actions on Immigration and Travel Ban” from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in Taper Hall (THH) 201. The entire campus community is invited to join USC experts as they address such questions as:

  • “What do the recent executive actions and the travel ban mean for USC’s global and local communities?” 
  • “What is the broader political context, and why have Americans around the country mobilized to challenge the perceived threats to civil liberties?”
  • “What impacts will this have on the university and and how can the university lead with its values of equity, diversity, and inclusion at the forefront?”

Friday, February 3:

USC student groups are holding a #NoBanNoWall solidarity rally at Tommy Trojan at 11:30 a.m.

**Please note: Dornsife Dialogues: Civility in Public Discourse” has been rescheduled for Feb. 24 to avoid conflict with today’s solidarity rally.

Monday, February 6:

International students are invited to “International Tea Time,” a drop-in space at Parkside Performance Cafe at 6 p.m. to enjoy free tea and Boba, connect with other international students, and share about common challenges. The event is facilitated by counselors from USC Student Counseling Services. 

Tuesday, February 21:

forum on civic governance, the presidency and political institutions, is held by the USC Price School. Professors Raphael Bostic, Kathleen Doherty, and Bill Resh will offer their expertise in this area from and lead a discussion 12:30-1:45 p.m. in RGL 219. Due to space limitations, this event is open to USC Price School students only.

Thursday, February 23:

The USC Muslim Student Union will host staff members from CAIR (Council on American Islamic Relations) and the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union) for a “Know Your Rights” workshop on at 7 p.m. in VKC 260.

Thursday, February 23:

A Roundtable on President Trump’s Recent Executive Order will be held by the USC Annenberg School. Dean Ernest Wilson and Professor Geoffrey Cowan will lead a discussion on what the recent executive orders mean for USC, international students, and the USC Annenberg School from 12:00-1:00 p.m. in Wallis Annenberg Hall in room ANN 106. The discussion will address questions that are of deep concern to our students such as the implications of the President’s Executive Order for their status at USC and in the United States, the support that the University will provide for students, and the risks, if any, to USC as an institution that could be posed by various courses of action. We will also explore the role of the press in explaining and even challenging these orders.

Friday, February 24:

How has public discourse on critical topics come to be so combative and is a return to civility possible? USC Dornsife Dean Amber D. Miller and USC Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics Director Robert Shrum present “Dornsife Dialogues: Civility in Public Discourse,” at 12 noon in Taper Hall (THH) 301. Moderated by Professor Peter Mancall, Divisional Dean for the Humanities and Social Sciences, we will explore ways that the university can lead a charge toward more civil exchanges in the public square. All students are invited to participate in this lively conversation.

Tuesday, March 7:

USC Price School of Public Policy hosts extremism expert Dr. Pete Simi for the presentation, “Hidden Spaces of Hate: Studying U.S. Far-Right Extremism,” in Doheny Memorial Library (DML) 240 from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Drawing from two decades of long-term ethnographic fieldwork and intensive interviewing with current and former far-right extremists, Simi will describe how an infrastructure of social-spatial contexts help sustain an extremist collective identity, and will also address how these contexts are linked to the “alt-right” and the recent election of Donald Trump.

“Assessing the Need for Immigrants: Impacts on the Workforce and Implications for Taxpayers” from 12:15 to 1:30 p.m. takes place in Lewis Hall (RGL) 101. USC Sol Price Professor Dowell Myers will discuss the National Academy of Sciences report on the economic and fiscal consequences of immigration, which is being widely referenced, including by President Trump in his speech before the joint session of Congress. The 500-page report contains a wealth of data, reflecting alternative scenarios, from which selected findings can be cherry picked without revealing any rationale.

Join the USC Annenberg Center (CCLP) and the USC Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics for a conversation on “Trump and the Press: Media Literacy, ‘Fake News,’ and the Challenges of Political Reporting in 2017.” The panel will be moderated by Jessica Yellin (CCLP Senior Fellow & Former CNN Chief White House Correspondent) and will feature Kurtis Lee (Los Angeles Times, Political Reporter), Joel Pollak (Breitbart, Senior Editor-at-Large), Nando Vila (Fusion, VP of Programming), Hannah Cranston (The Young Turks, Host & Executive Producer of ThinkTank) and Ken LaCorte (Founder of LaCorte News & former SVP of FoxNews.com). It will take place on  from 5:30-7:00 p.m. in the main forum/lobby of Wallis Annenberg Hall.

Wednesday, March 8:

International students are invited to “International Tea Time,” a drop-in space at Parkside Performance Cafe at 6 p.m. to enjoy free tea and Boba, connect with other international students, and share about common challenges. The event is facilitated by counselors from USC Student Counseling Services. 

Tuesday, March 28:

USC Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics moderates “CA vs the USA: How CA is Mobilizing to Protect its Climate Agenda,” a conversation on California’s climate change agenda and how it differs from the climate agenda of the Trump administration, at Ground Zero Performance Cafe from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Tuesday, April 4:

Join USC Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics for “Equal Rights in the Trump Administration,” a conversation on equal rights and how and why they will be affected during the Trump administration, at Ground Zero Performance Cafe from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Tuesday, April 11:

USC Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics hosts “Trump’s 100 Days,” a conversation to recap Trump’s first 100 days, the promises President-elect Trump made, and the outcomes, at Ground Zero Performance Cafe from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. The event features a student panel with members of the USC College Democrats, USC College Republicans, Daily Trojan, and USC Annenberg Media.

Wednesday, April 26:

The USC Unruh Institute of Politics and the Dornsife Department of Political Science present a full-day conference on “President Trump’s First 100 Days,” from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Town and Gown (TFG).  The day will be filled with panels focusing on: 1) the findings and implications of a new USC Dornsife LA Times Daybreak survey on the Hundred Days, and 2) the events since January 20 and what they mean for the future of domestic policy, foreign affairs, national security, and the two political parties.  Special guests will include scholars, policy makers, political actors, and journalists.